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Japanese people believed in their magical foxes well into the eighteenth century. In the Persona series, a spinoff of the larger Megami Tensei video game series, Inari is a persona of Yusuke Kitagawa, who appears in a fox mask and tail. [44] For example, a 12th-century tale describes a man using a fox's hoshi no tama to secure a favor; "Confound you!" She begged her husband to kill it, but he refused. He is regarded in Shintō lore as the messenger who ensures that farmers pay their offerings to the rice god. No two Kitsune are exactly alike, and all of them are complex characters! The ball contains his soul, and without it, he will grow powerless and die. Kitsune have as many as nine tails. Most Kitsune prove to be affectionate and loyal wives, although the marriage usually ends with the Kitsune being chased away. 『Kitsune are very popular in today's pop culture and make various appearances.』 ⇝Nine-Tailed Demon Fox which was sealed within Naruto Uzumaki, main character of the anime and manga. If we ever make trouble again, then of course you must act as you think best. Stories depict legendary foxes as intelligent beings and as possessing paranormal abilities that increase as they get older and wiser. [6], Smyers (1999) notes that the idea of the fox as seductress and the connection of the fox myths to Buddhism were introduced into Japanese folklore through similar Chinese stories, but she maintains that some fox stories contain elements unique to Japan.[7]. The world Kitsune does not literally mean ‘Fox’. Their high intelligence and boundless creativity make them hard to predict. Special tofu recipes were invented as offerings for the foxes who lived around Inari’s temples. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore and are akin to European faeries; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. The most ancient one goes like this: (From the tale It comes back and sleeps written by monk Kyoukai in late VIII s. Or in the beginning of IX s.) All orders are custom made and most ship worldwide within 24 hours. One belief is that when a kitsune changes shape, its hoshi no tama holds a portion of its magical power. [12] Generally, a greater number of tails indicates an older and more powerful Kitsune; in fact, some folktales say that a fox will only grow additional tails after it has lived 100 years. In Japanese mythology, Inari is the androgynous deity of rice. The Kitsune (Japanese: 狐 OR きつね) are fox-type Yōkai from Japanese mythology. Kitsune (キツネ) is the Japanese word for Fox.Early portrayals of kitsune cast them as heralds of Inari Ōkami, the god of rice, but in some areas of the country the worship of the foxes became more important than the god they served.There is no single, universal concept of kitsune just as there is no single, universal concept of “ghost” or “demon”.In Japanese folklore, all foxes exhibit some level of magical ability including shapeshifting … I am really happy I found this! Many of the earliest surviving stories are recorded in the Konjaku Monogatarishū, an 11th-century collection of Chinese, Indian, and Japanese narratives. Those who suffer from the condition believe they are possessed by a fox. As for the foxes, in Japanese folklore the kitsune (Japanese word for ‘fox,’ but also the name given to mythical fox spirits) is one of the most notorious creatures. [13] As a common prerequisite for the transformation, the fox must place reeds, a leaf, or a skull over its head. Most of the time, the yako target arrogant or lazy people, but they’ve been known to harass innocents as well! Foxes have long been worshipped as kami. Kitsune also have psychic powers. Hola amantes del maquillaje. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others – as foxes in folklore often do – other stories portray them as faithful guardians, friends, lovers, and wives. Kitsune are rated in power by the number of tails they have. [41] Some stories identify them as magical jewels or pearls. Daji eventually brought about the fall of the entire Shang Dynasty. They tend to go for shapes that command maximum respect: an elegant young woman or a wise old priest. Fox and Tanuki Netsuke by Sukenaga, early 19th Century, V&A Museum. Blog. So every evening she stole back and slept in his arms. 58 Comments. The headman beats the hunter, whom he outranks; the hunter beats the fox, whom he shoots; the fox beats the headman, whom he bewitches. [29] Though foxes in folklore can possess a person of their own will, kitsunetsuki is often attributed to the malign intents of hereditary fox employers. It’s so hard to find information on Kitsune for me! Folktales of China tell of fox spirits called húli jīng (Chinese: 狐狸精) that may have up to nine tails; these were adopted into Japanese culture as kyūbi no kitsune ('nine-tailed fox') which is covered in more detail below). Their victims are usually men; women are possessed instead. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. [73], Stephen Turnbull, in "Nagashino 1575", relates the tale of the Takeda clan's involvement with a fox-woman. They were thought to be a type of shapeshifting yokai that was quite intelligent and sometimes a trickster. High quality Japanese Kitsune gifts and merchandise. [42] When not in human form or possessing a human, a kitsune keeps the ball in its mouth or carries it on its tail. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shapeshift into human form. [19] Kitsune-gao ('fox-faced') refers to human females who have a narrow face with close-set eyes, thin eyebrows, and high cheekbones. This does not mean that kitsune are ghosts, nor that they are fundamentally different from regular foxes. There is one particularly famous kitsune known as Tam… [55], Inari's kitsune are white, a color of a good omen. Disguised as beautiful young women, they frequently intermarry with humans. In his later years, his red fur might begin to turn gold, then, finally white. They must gain their magical looks—along with their magical powers—over time. The Kitsune also have miscellaneous other powers. Kitsune (Japanese Mythology) By Faid-Eyren Watch. When such progeny are human, they possess special physical or supernatural qualities that often pass to their own children. I love reading anything on Kitsune! In lore, the Goddess of Kitsune, Inari, is usually depicted as being the only ten-tailed kitsune. The Kitsune. In the US dogs are considered mans best friend, and in Canada the beaver is their national animal. They appear in Naruto, Pokemon, Animal Crossing, Zelda and Mario. These magical multi-tailed foxes can shapeshift into people, possess humans like demons, or charm people to do their bidding. They can also be portrayed as bipedal. Occasionally a kitsune attaches itself to a person or household, where they can cause all sorts of mischief. Kitsune Mythology. Interesting fox stories from both China and Japan, though the Inari portion is really scanty. 1961. A kitsune may take on human form, an ability learned when it reaches a certain age – usually 100 years, although some tales say 50. ", The fox later saves his life by leading him past a band of armed robbers. These old sources are written in Man'yōgana, which clearly identifies the historical form of the word (when rendered into a Latin-alphabet transliteration) as ki1tune. Chinese folk tales tell of fox spirits called húli jīng (Chinese: 狐狸精) that may have up to nine tails (Kyūbi no Kitsune in Japanese). Many of the earliest surviving stories are recorded in the Konjaku Monogatarishū, an 11th-century Japanese collection of Japanese, Chinese, and Indian literary narratives. If they’re in a troublemaking mood, they can also pose as humans they’ve seen before: a prince who can command an army or an enemy who needs to be humiliated. But the Kitsune aren’t all fun and games—they can be incredibly wise, and incredibly dangerous, too! Jun 18, 2020 - Explore Philippe Baquet's board "japanese folklore", followed by 361 people on Pinterest. Foxes (狐 or kitsune) are associated with the God Inari (稲荷) who is worshiped for fertility, rice, tea, sake, agriculture, industry and general prosperity and success. Kitsune, just like foxes, are predators who respect a rule of strength, are insanely teritorial and protective of their family, and they are WAY more powerful than any regular mortal. Sometimes they lie down and froth at the mouth, and yelp as a fox yelps. Kitsu was the word used to indicate the sound emitted by these animals. || Hello makeup lovers. They might also bring messages to rulers or become guardians of specific households, bringing their families wealth and happiness. ‘Kitsune’ is included in a large group of creatures known as Yokai (yōkai – demons, goblins, spirits, apparitions, leprechauns,) that are feared, admired, and worshiped almost as deities. While zenko foxes can be mischievous, yako foxes can be downright destructive. Most tales of kitsune are about foxes punishing wicked priests, greedy merchants, and boastful drunkards. Thank you for this! What’s magical, immortal, and incredibly adorable? If you hesitate to take action in this matter I shall issue orders for the destruction of every fox in the land. Kitsune: The Foxy Side of Japanese Mythology . In some stories, kitsune retain – and have difficulty hiding – their tails when they take human form; looking for the tail, perhaps when the fox gets drunk or careless, is a common method of discerning the creature's true nature. For example, every hundred years, a Kitsune grows a new tail. One folktale illustrating these imperfections in the kitsune's human shape concerns Koan, a historical person later credited with legendary wisdom and magical powers of divination. Similarly, Inari-zushi is a type of sushi named for Inari Ōkami that consists of rice-filled pouches of fried tofu. Many of the earliest surviving stories are recorded in the Konjaku Monogatarishū, an 11th-century collection of Chinese, Indian, and Japanese … And on some part of the body of the possessed a moving lump appears under the skin, which seems to have a life of its own. The man eventually discovers the fox's true nature, and the fox-wife is forced to leave him. Ono, an inhabitant of Mino (says an ancient Japanese legend of A.D. 545), spent the seasons longing for his ideal of female beauty. [36], In modern psychiatry, the term kitsunetsuki refers to a culture-bound syndrome unique to Japanese culture. Though foxes in folklore can possess a person of their own will, kits… And now, sir, you're understandably fed up with us. [33][34] Possession was the explanation for the abnormal behavior displayed by the afflicted individuals. Inari is therefore also associated with business and money, and many people ask them for blessings for these things. They ruin reputations, steal valuables, and even lure travelers into deadly traps. They are a type of yōkai. Nozaki also suggests that the word was originally onomatopoetic: This page was last edited on 18 December 2020, at 20:55. Then, "in his pain, he ran out of the bathroom naked. [37] Symptoms include cravings for rice or sweet adzuki beans, listlessness, restlessness, and aversion to eye contact. There’s also a kitsune as one of the bosses in Okami (a game based around Japanese mythology and folklore). [19] For example, kitsune are thought to employ their kitsunebi to lead travelers astray in the manner of a will-o'-the-wisp. For me, it's a terrible loss. [19] Other common goals of trickster kitsune include seduction, theft of food, humiliation of the prideful, or vengeance for a perceived slight. Accordingly, common households thought to harbor kitsune are treated with suspicion. I gather that you're going to kill us all. If you catch him off guard, you might catch a glimpse of his bottlebrush tail! They may dress up as monks to collect money from unsuspecting innocent people, for example. 5K Views. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore and are akin to European faeries; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Many etymological suggestions have been made, though there is no general agreement: Kitsu is now archaic; in modern Japanese, a fox's cry is transcribed as kon kon or gon gon. If you do give it back though, I'll stick to you like a protector god. A Nogitsune is a dark fox spirit, one who feeds off chaos, strife, and pain. Many Kitsune, both zenko and yako, seem to have a romantic streak as well. [11] For example, a ninko is an invisible fox spirit that human beings can only perceive when it possesses them. But the young ones, sir – I'm sure they'll understand when I explain to them why you're so upset. Oh wow! You'll find information on foxes, fox mythology, and particularly Japanese fox mythology here. [68] The kitsune may be a seductress, but these stories are more often romantic in nature. He can have up to nine tails total. The man refuses, and the foxes resign themselves to moving to an abandoned lot nearby. Still, they can be broadly split into two groups: the zenko and the yako. Kitsune first debuted in Japanese literature in the eighth century, and their legend has never faded since. Because of their potential power and influence, some people make sacrifices to them as to a deity. [65], Tales distinguish kitsune gifts from kitsune payments. Chinese folk tales tell of fox spirits called huli jing that may have up to nine tails (Kyūbi no Kitsune in Japanese). https://www.japanitalybridge.com/en/2017/03/japan-folklore-kitsune In the latter, they are changing breeds whose abilities come from Inari and who all serve Inari in different ways… These magical foxes love to take human forms. Inari and their connection to kitsunemake them a prominent deity in Japanese popular culture: 1. Aug 2, 2020 - Japanese mythological creature kitsune My Favorite!!!. Japan is full of fox spirits. japanese mythology magical Kitsune nine tails fox - Buy this stock vector and explore similar vectors at Adobe Stock [70], Other stories tell of kitsune marrying one another. Kitsune Society is an Adult themed hangout in a Japanese Mythology or Lore styled theme in Second Life. They may dress up as monks to collect money from unsuspecting innocent people, for example. -It was depicted in the japanese cartoon named "Naruto". [10] This appears to be tied to a specific story; it is one of the oldest surviving kitsune tales,[9] and unlike most of those in which a kitsune takes the form of a human woman and marries men, this one does not end tragically. A Kitsune may take on human form and may have up to nine tails The warlord Takeda Shingen, in 1544, defeated in battle a lesser local warlord named Suwa Yorishige and drove him to suicide after a "humiliating and spurious" peace conference, after which Shingen forced marriage on Suwa Yorishige's beautiful 14-year-old daughter Lady Koi – Shingen's own niece. ", Other kitsune use their magic for the benefit of their companion or hosts as long as the humans treat them with respect. They are Japanese trickster spirits that take the form of a fox. Background information: Kitsune is an evil animal in Japanese folklore. In human form, the Kitsune are known for being very attractive. Their cute faces and small size make them particularly loved by most people.Kitsune yokai, however, often have many tails. The word kitsune is sometimes translated as 'fox spirit', which is actually a broader folkloric category. When two Kitsune marry, they host elaborate wedding celebrations, which may include conjuring up magical “foxfire” lanterns or calling rain down from a clear blue sky. ^~^. But, in Japanese mythology, Kitsune is usually depicted as a youkai, or a supernatural being from Japan. [28] In some cases, the victims' facial expressions are said to change in such a way that they resemble those of a fox. Browse and enjoy, but please respect the work we've put into this page and link rather than copy, if possible. Common belief in medieval Japan was that any woman encountered alone, especially at dusk or night, could be a kitsune. [22] A particularly devout individual may even be able to see through a fox's disguise merely by perceiving them. A. Sutherland - AncientPages.com - One of the most important and famous figures in Japanese mythology is Kitsune (‘fox’). All countries have animals they hold in high respect. A variety of kitsune mythology can be seen connected to Inari shrines. Some can control the weather and others can see the future. The Kitsune is a creature with origins in Japanese mythology, legend and folklore. [23] Kitsune can also be exposed while in human form by their fear and hatred of dogs, and some become so rattled by their presence that they revert to the form of a fox and flee. Kitsune are connected to the Buddhist religion through the Dakiniten, goddesses conflated with Inari's female aspect. [22] The astrologer-magician Abe no Seimei was reputed to have inherited such extraordinary powers. See more ideas about kitsune, kitsune fox, japanese folklore. The charming Kitsune have not lost their hold on Japanese culture. Their powers are limited only by their imaginations, which, considering the Kitsune’s lively imagination, means that they are hardly limited at all! They are female spirits who use their wiles and cunning either to help or harm humans around them. I tell you, if you don't give it back, I'll be your enemy forever. Foxes, or kitsune, are found all across Japan, and are identical to wild foxes found elsewhere in the world, apart from their incredible magical powers. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. See more ideas about kitsune, japanese mythology, kitsune fox. Kitsune: Japan's fox of mystery, romance and humor. This may sound like a small thing to be the deity of, but in the past rice was used as a measure of wealth. Some of the oldest and most powerful Kitsune can take on other shapes as well. [74], Shapeshifting fox-spirits in Japanese folk mythology, This article is about the Japanese word for the fox. Sometimes they run naked shouting through the streets. Kitsunetsuki (狐憑き, 狐付き), also written kitsune-tsuki, literally means \"the state of being possessed by a fox\". Many stories tell of fox-wives bearing children. Aug 15, 2015 - I love japanese mythology. [39], There are families that tell of protective fox spirits, and in certain regions, possession by a kuda-gitsune,[17] osaki,[17][40] yako,[39] and hitogitsune are also called kitsunetsuki. We accept everyone with no judgement and want you to always visit and enjoy. Kitsune - Meaning of Japanese Kitsune Mask. But I just want you to know, sir, how sorry I am that this is our last night of life. When their son Takeda Katsuyori proved to be a disastrous leader and led the clan to their devastating defeat at the battle of Nagashino, Turnbull writes, "wise old heads nodded, remembering the unhappy circumstances of his birth and his magical mother". [11] They possess the power to ward off evil, and they sometimes serve as guardian spirits. [38], In folk religion, stories of fox possession can be found in all lands of Japan. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. i love japanese mythology and this is very helpful thanks. Welcome to The Kitsune Page! Simultaneously with the birth of their son, Ono's dog was delivered of a pup which as it grew up became more and more hostile to the lady of the moors. A few Kitsune may seduce men, only to rob them or place them in humiliating positions after they’ve fallen asleep. Stories tell of kitsune playing tricks on overly proud samurai, greedy merchants, and boastful commoners, while the crueler ones abuse poor tradesmen and farmers or devout Buddhist monks. Her fondness for watching and inventing new forms of torture are legendary. Prick it with a needle, and it glides instantly to another place. They are cunning, sneaky, enigmatic and unpredictable. They eat only what foxes are believed to like – tofu, aburagé, azukimeshi, etc. 2. [20] Variants on the theme have the kitsune retain other foxy traits, such as a coating of fine hair, a fox-shaped shadow, or a reflection that shows its true form.[21]. Foxes and humans lived close together in ancient Japan; this companionship gave rise to legends about the creatures. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. [39][40] These families are said to have been able to use their fox to gain fortune, but marriage into such a family was considered forbidden as it would enlarge the family. The oldest known usage of the word is in text Shin'yaku Kegonkyō Ongi Shiki, dating to 794. The folk etymology would have it that because the fox returns to her husband each night as a woman but leaves each morning as a fox she is called kitsune. Kitsune (girl) Kitsune (fox) There are 2 types of Kitsune: the good one are called Inari foxes, and the bad ones are called nogitsune. In Japan, Kitsune can be both male and female, though the females are still vastly more common. Carmen Blacker, The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan (Japan Library Classics) Routledge, 1999; The Fox and the Jewel: Shared and Private Meanings in Contemporary Japanese Inari Workship. Other tales credit them with infinite wisdom (omniscience). [35] The superstition has lost favor, but stories of fox possession still occur, such as allegations that members of the Aum Shinrikyo cult had been possessed. Would love your thoughts, please comment. See more ideas about Kitsune, Japanese mythology, Kitsune mask. User with this ability either is or can transform into an kitsune (Japanese: fox), a fox-spirit, who usually gain their powers by living long and keep growing stronger as they age: the more tails a kitsune has (they may have as many as nine), the older, wiser, and more powerful it is. Japanese folklore tends to be in keeping with what we can expect from foxes in pop culture. Noh, kyogen, bunraku, and kabuki plays derived from folk tales feature them,[46][47] as do contemporary works such as anime, manga and video games. Madeline O'Hara. In some cases, the husband wakes as if from a dream, filthy, disoriented, and far from home. She managed to escape execution, and fled to the … The Kitsune is an aspect of an element, which means their abilities are tied to the elements. Before such happened he used to be one of the more blessed members of his kind which manifested in his ability to gain more tails over time, but it was true only up to the 4th one. "You may be a fox," Ono called after her, "but you are the mother of my son and I will always love you. There are two common classifications of kitsune: Local traditions add further types. Some can breathe fire. Very young kitsune have one tail; the most powerful mortal kitsune have nine tails (Japanese: 九尾, kyūbi). How to increase brand awareness through consistency; Dec. 11, 2020. [13] (In the wild, the typical lifespan of a real fox is one to three years, although individuals may live up to ten years in captivity.) Into this Page was last edited on 18 December 2020, at japanese mythology kitsune that command respect. Place them in exchange for its return ; the most powerful mortal have. Aren ’ t all fun and games—they can be incredibly wise, and serve its... Going to kill us all lost their hold on Japanese culture and incredibly dangerous, too Ōkami that of... Although the marriage usually ends with the kitsune is also said to change in such a way that are! Exterminate the foxes resign themselves to moving to an abandoned lot nearby century... To a deity century, only the homeowner 's threat to exterminate the foxes resign themselves moving... 'S soul ; the most important and famous figures in Japanese folklore ; in English, can. 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